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How To Make Craft Beer Tap Decals And Keg Collars On The Cheap

How To Make Craft Beer Tap Decals And Keg Collars On The Cheap

How To Make Craft Beer Tap Decals And Keg Collars On The Cheap

How To Make Craft Beer Tap Decals And Keg Collars On The Cheap

Brewing beer isn’t all that glamorous.

I’ll go back to that. You know those shiny decals you see in your favorite bars. 

We needed 14, but ideally needed 28 because some bars like to display them back-to-back ,so the bar staff knows what’s there. 

How To Make Craft Beer Tap Decals And Keg Collars On The Cheap

A few trips to the local craft store and we found an $8 circle cutter!

It’s basically a compass with a knife blade.

Soon they were cut & another job was crossed off our list, and that was our release.

This led to our barrel collar, which customers never see.

By doing some bar work, bar staff can easily and quickly identify kegs.

Turns out the customers do see them!,

How To Make Craft Beer Tap Decals And Keg Collars On The Cheap

To make the barrel collar, we used construction plastic, a round cutter, stickers and white Nikkei. 

A material other than plastic would have been ideal, but it needed to be waterproof, so we quickly couldn’t think of a better option. 

Do you have any questions?

 

Let us know in the comments and we’ll do our best to answer them.

Brewing water

“If the water tastes good, you can brew with it.”

I’ve heard this too many times to count. While the brewing process is highly tolerant of harsh conditions, if the distribution of the water doesn’t suit the style of beer, it’s unlikely to be a good beer.

If you are using tank water, find the nearest water testing facility or use distilled/spring water.

The main ions are:

  • Calcium (Ca+2) – determines the hardness of the water ,and contributes to many processes of saccharification and boiling.
  • Magnesium (Mg+2) – an important yeast nutrient in very low concentrations.
  • Bicarbonate (HCO3-1) – balances the pH of the water.
  • Sulfate (SO4-2) – compliments the bitterness of hops.
  • Sodium (Na+1) – balances the sweetness of the beer.
  • Chloride (Cl-1) – emphasizes the fullness of the beer.
Brewing water

“If the water tastes good, you can brew with it.”

I’ve heard this too many times to count. While the brewing process is highly tolerant of harsh conditions, if the distribution of the water doesn’t suit the style of beer, it’s unlikely to be a good beer.

If you are using tank water, find the nearest water testing facility or use distilled/spring water.

The main ions are:

·        Calcium (Ca+2) – determines the hardness of the water ,and contributes to many processes of saccharification and boiling.

·        Magnesium (Mg+2) – an important yeast nutrient in very low concentrations.

·        Bicarbonate (HCO3-1) – balances the pH of the water.

·        Sulfate (SO4-2) – compliments the bitterness of hops.

·        Sodium (Na+1) – balances the sweetness of the beer.

·        Chloride (Cl-1) – emphasizes the fullness of the beer.

If your water level is higher than the target for that style, you can dilute it with distilled water. 

BeerSmith has a great water profiling tool to calculate your additions. 

 

Common minerals include table salt (NaCl), gypsum (CaSO4), calcium chloride (CaCl), lagoon salt (MgSO4), baking soda (NaHCO3), and chalk (CaCO3).

Choosing your ingredients

Before we get into the malt, hops and yeast that will produce the perfect spirit, I want to focus on something very important that is not usually considered when preparing recipes; freshness.

When you’re at LHBS, try as hard as you can to taste these ingredients: chew the grain, you need a solid contraction from the hull and a delicious malt flavor from the starch inside. 

If it chews the hooch, consider using a different grain or supplier.

Heat exchangers are handy for full-size beers, but if you’re just brewing at home, throwing cubes into the pool is a popular technique.

The beer was then transferred to conditioning tanks for 2 weeks for carbonation and kegging.